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HEALTHY DINING TRENDS-US-MARCH 2018

Published By :

Mintel

Published Date : Mar 2018

Category :

Foodservice

No. of Pages : N/A

Consumers are no longer satisfied by the basics when it comes to ordering a healthy dish at a restaurant; unique, flavor-driven dishes are becoming the norm. Highlighting ingredient quality gives even indulgent dishes, like pizza and burgers, a halo of health. Younger consumers are being impacted by this trend and they are finding it increasingly difficult to identify healthy items on a menu, compared to older generations. This is leading more food and beverages to feature specific functional benefits that can clearly guide consumers toward healthy eating decisions that fit their lifestyle.

Table of contents
OVERVIEW
What you need to know
Definition
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The issues
Cost is a leading barrier for eating healthy food
Figure 1: Health barriers, November 2017
iGens have a blurred view of health
Figure 2: Health barriers, by iGens and Millennials, November 2017
The opportunities
Restaurants need to focus on flavor and innovation when it comes to healthy offerings
Figure 3: Motivators for eating healthy, November 2017
Functional benefits gain attention from younger consumers
Figure 4: Interest in functional benefits, by iGens and Millennials, November 2017
Hispanics and Black consumers trust restaurants when it comes to health
Figure 5: Healthy dining attitudes, by Hispanic origin and Black consumers, November 2017
What it means
THE MARKET – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Retailers and meal kits aim to make cooking at home a breeze
Social media adds aspirational elements to healthy eating
Kids’ meals slowly start to evolve
MARKET PERSPECTIVE
The simplification of cooking healthy food at home
Meal kits cater to specific diet trends
Retail strives to make eating healthy as convenient as takeout
Figure 6: Purchase intent for select Trader Joe’s products, January 2018
MARKET FACTORS
Health is in the eye of the beholder
A “filtered” view toward health: the social media impact
Kids’ menus slowly adapt to new health trends
KEY TRENDS – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Health is not one size fits all for different restaurant segments
Cost can hold consumers back
Workout, then brunch…
WHAT’S WORKING BY SEGMENT
QSRs approach health indirectly
Fast casuals lead in trends
FSRs need to focus on the dining out occasion
Specialty beverage operators: coffee/tea shops and smoothie/juice bars
WHAT’S STRUGGLING?
Affordability can make health feel out of reach for many
Figure 7: Cost as a barrier to healthy eating, by HH income, November 2017
WHAT’S NEXT?
Integrated health
THE CONSUMER – WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW
Heart health has broad consumer reach
A majority of consumers are not overwhelmed by health trends
Personal motivation is important for both men and women
RESTAURANT VISITATION AND THE HEALTHY PERSPECTIVE
QSRs drive mainstream visitation, primarily due to availability and affordability
Figure 8: Restaurant visitation, November 2017
Smoothie/juice shops drive functional trends
Figure 9: Restaurant visitation, by health benefit interest, November 2017
Urban environments have increased exposure to both indulgence and health
Figure 10: Restaurant visitation, by location, November 2017
GENERATIONAL VIEWS TOWARD HEALTH
A deeper look into iGens and Millennials
Figure 11: Restaurant visitation, by iGens and Millennials, November 2017
Figure 12: Health barriers, by iGens and Millennials, November 2017
Figure 13: Interest in functional benefits, by iGens and Millennials, November 2017
Figure 14: Motivators for eating healthy, by iGens and Millennials, November 2017
A deeper look at consumers 42+ (Generation X, Baby Boomers, World War II/Swing Generation)
Figure 15: Restaurant visitation, by Gen X, Baby Boomers, and World War II/Swing Generation, November 2017
Figure 16: Healthy statement agreement, “I pay attention to sodium levels when dining out,” by generation X, Baby Boomers, and World War II/Swing Generation, November 2017
Finding common ground across generations
Figure 17: Interest in functional benefits, heart health, by generations, November 2017
Figure 18: Healthy statement agreement, “restaurants should be more transparent about their ingredients and preparation methods,” by generations, November 2017
Figure 19: Motivator for eating healthy, “Healthy items beyond salads,” by generations, November 2017
HEALTHY DINING ATTITUDES
Transparency and quality are key expectations among consumers
Figure 20: Healthy dining attitude, November 2017
Hispanics and Black consumers feel the pressure of health trends
Figure 21: Healthy dining attitude, by Hispanic origin and Black consumers, November 2017
INTEREST IN FUNCTIONAL BENEFITS
Specialized health benefits gain traction
Figure 22: Interest in functional benefits, November 2017
Women seek broader sources for healthy fats compared to men
Figure 23: Interest in functional benefits, by gender, November 2017
Hispanics prefer to have benefits clearly highlighted
Figure 24: Interest in functional benefits, by Hispanic origin, November 2017
MOTIVATORS FOR EATING HEALTHY
A basic salad just won’t cut it anymore
Figure 25: Motivators for eating healthy, November 2017
Diners are open to trying veggies in new ways, but not necessarily to replace a burger
Figure 26: Motivators for eating healthy by restaurant segment, November 2017
Personal motivation is not one in the same for men and women
Figure 27: Motivators for eating healthy, by gender, November 2017
Urban consumers put the pressure on restaurants to gain their interest
Figure 28: Motivators for eating healthy, by location, November 2017
HEALTH BARRIERS
Cost and availability are key barriers to health
Figure 29: Health barriers, November 2017
Cost is an increased concern for families
Figure 30: Health barriers, by parental status, November 2017
Indulgent offerings are more convenient, despite more health variety
Figure 31: Health barriers, by location, November 2017
PRICE ANALYSIS: GRAIN BOWLS
Methodology
Customization is key for grain bowls when it comes to pricing
Figure 32: Price sensitivity – Price summary table, December 2017
Figure 33: Price sensitivity, medium grain bowl – Optimal price, December 2017
Figure 34: Price sensitivity, medium grain bowl – Threshold prices, December 2017
Figure 35: Price sensitivity, medium grain bowl with organic grass-fed steak – Optimal price, December 2017
Figure 36: Price sensitivity, medium grain bowl with organic grass-fed steak – Threshold prices, December 2017
APPENDIX – DATA SOURCES AND ABBREVIATIONS
Data sources
Consumer survey data
Consumer qualitative research
Abbreviations and terms
Abbreviations
APPENDIX – PRICE SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS
Figure 37: Price sensitivity, medium grain bowl – Price sensitivity aggregate table, December 2017
Figure 38: Price sensitivity, Medium grain bowl with organic grass-fed beef – Price sensitivity aggregate table, December 2017

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